Mercosur: The Unbreakable Dignity of Delcy Rodríguez

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By: Carlos Aznárez / Source: Resumen Latinoamericano / The Dawn News / December 15, 2016

Photo credit: Nodal
Photo credit: Nodal

 

There are facts, images and gestures that seem to picture intolerance, the brutality of some individuals, and the amount of fascism that runs through their veins. Currently, Argentina is filled with that. They find fertile ground in this political context that has unloaded a crisis on the inhabitants of the country.

Macri’s government has done more than just impoverishing the common citizen with taxes, a monthly-growing inflation, massive layoffs at a national level, and destruction of social programs, institutions and community services. On top of that, they have sprinkled laws to repress, arbitrary detentions, threats and other attacks to the rights of the people.

Yes, we know that capitalism, today, can’t afford subtleties. Its brutality is transparent. And it finds refuge in its impunity and lack of accountability.

But this introduction doesn’t begin to describe the feeling of shame that many of us Argentines felt last Wednesday upon seeing the hostile and violent treatment that the Venezuelan Chancellor Delcy Rodríguez and her Bolivian counterpart David Choquehuanca received at the Mercosur meeting held in Buenos Aires, Argentina.

Photo credit: Resumen Latinoamericano
Photo credit: Resumen Latinoamericano

 

The result couldn’t be more pathetic: in order to prevent Venezuela from participating in the meeting of the Mercosur (an organism that it presides since a few months ago), the Triple Alliance plus one (Argentina, Paraguay, Brazil and Uruguay) chose to send their security forces to block the entrance of the legitimate representative of a member country: Delcy Rodríguez (Chancellor of Venezuela and faithful disciple of Hugo Chávez, a woman with courage and an admirable political consciousness) and the Bolivian Chancellor, David Choquehuanca.

Delcy knew well that her presence at a meeting of chancellors (where with two of the member countries are ruled by putschist governments, and two others are on the right of the political spectrum) was not going to be well received. But Venezuela, contrary to what the hegemonic media maintains, has much respect for legality. So the Chancellor, undaunted by the rudeness she might be met with, went, in compliance with her role, and demanded to dialogue and an explanation for the aggressive behavior her colleagues have displayed.

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Photo credit: Resumen Latinoamericano

 

Delcy Rodríguez is a daughter of the founder of the Socialist League of Venezuela, Jorge Rodríguez, who was murdered by the political police in 1976. She didn’t mind being punched, pushed and insulted as she tried to enter the building. She went on, smiling, and, once inside, she turned around and greeted the demonstrators that supported her with a victorious raised fist.

Once inside, she had no better luck. There, a security agent attempted to convince her that “she wasn’t invited” to the meeting —the same words used by Argentine Chancellor Susana Malcorra. Delcy went on, eluded being grabbed by the am, and entered the meeting room, where the representatives of Brazil, Argentina, Paraguay and Uruguay were getting ready to deliberate. Upon seeing the Chancellors of Bolivia and Venezuela enter, they fell completely silent.

Due to the violent treatment she received, Rodríguez has a splinted, bruised arm. This event, that in a different century would have caused a war, now was justified by Malcorra in a provocative declaration. If a diplomat is treated like this, common citizens can expect no better treatment.

Despite what happened, Delcy Rodríguez and David Choquenhuanca should know that many Argentines feel proud of their rebellious behavior. Because they called a spade a spade, because they don’t hesitate about which side to take when the integration of the countries of the continent is at stake. Because they are Chavists, Bolivarians and revolutionaries. The image of Delcy, bruised but determined, raising her fist high, will remain in history. Unbreakable, like her father.

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