What is the impact of Temer’s decision regarding mining in the Amazonia?

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The National Copper Reserve is an area of 47 thousand square kilometers between the states of Pará and Amapá, in the Northern region of Brazil / Photo Credit: EBC

Member of the Movement for Popular Sovereignty in Minery clarifies some matters.

By: Luciana Console / Source: Brasil de Fato / The Dawn News / September 5, 2017
Edition: Camila Salmazio / Portuguese-Spanish Translation: Luiza Mançano

The decision of the Brazilian putschist president, Michel Temer, of depleting one of the environmental reserves of the Amazonia generated indignation between environmentalist and the whole Brazilian society.

Through a decree, the National Copper and Similars Reserve (RENCA) would be depleted, an area with over 4 million hectares localized between the states of Pará and Amapá, in the Northern region of Brazil; this territory would be exploited by minery and foreign companies.

In less than a week, Temer revoked the decision and proposed a new text, but the alterations do not change the impacts of initial decision on the Amazonic region.

In the Brazilian streets, a lot of people is asking themselves what would be the consequences of this measure. So, Brasil de Fato talked with Jarbas Vieira, of the Movement for Popular Sovereignty in Minery (MAM), which is part of the Brazilian Via Campesina, who stated to us:

“Firstly, we must comprehend that the Brazilian Amazonia is a dispute zone due to the water reserves, the biodiversity and the mineral resources that exist on the region. We can not forget that there is actually minery in the region, different kinds of it, even illegal minery exploitation in the frontiers.
So, we already have a permanent conflict between mining companies and the population of the Amazonia. The government of Temer decided to extinguish the National Copper and Similars Reserve, or RENCA, an area of 46.500 square kilometers, bigger than Denmark, an area responsible of an exiguous climate control in Brazil and in the world. Imagine the impact of the deforestation, of this hole in the Brazilian Amazonia.
But besides the climate and environmental matters, we can not forget that one of Temer’s policies was to hand over our mining resources, localized in the subsoil, for international exploitation.
What we will have left? Conflicts between companies and the population that lives in the region, a loss in the national sovereignty and in the people’s right to decide ‘what, how and when’ the soil and subsoils will be exploited, and what is even worse, the handing out of our mineral resources to international companies that will leave Brazil and will return as manufactured products, which will be over 10 or even 15 times more expensive”.

 

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